Superwoman by E J Catering – The Royal Wedding

What will be on the menu for Kate and William next week?  I write so many wedding menus with the brides at my humble kitchen in Cardiff, we are creative, traditional, informal, formal, left field, classic but whatever they choose it always includes the couple’s favourite flavours and expresses something personal about them.

I can’t wait to read the royal menu, will it be cutting edge, will it be traditional?  My guess is it will be British, local and seasonal – the buzz words of the moment and for very good reason.  The food we produce here in Britain is excellent. The vegetable gardens and royal allotments won’t be in full bloom but I would bet their land and producers feature. Will any Welsh produce be included?

Looking back on the royal wedding menu history, Victoria and Albert in 1840 ate an elaborate menu of at least 10 courses, written in French as is the royal banqueting custom, and promising such gastronomic delights as cod with oyster sauce, roast leg of lamb, ballotine of duck with Cumberland sauce, pheasant with potato ribbons, pastries with fruit and chocolate profiteroles. Elizabeth Bowes Lyons’ wedding to the Duke of York in 1924 had a nine foot wedding cake, as it is traditional to send cake around the world to the many dignitaries that didn’t quite make the list but could not be left out altogether.

Our current queen had her wedding cake made from ingredients from around the world in order to link her subjects to her special day.

Another tradition is to have part of the menu named after your self for example Consommé à la Windsor, Suprèmes de Saumon Reine Mary and Côtelettes d’Agneau Prince Albert.  For dessert Elizabeth II commissioned Bombe Glacée Princess Elizabeth!   Andrew and Sarah’s main course of Carre d’agneau Palosie was served with Couroane d’Epinards aux Champignons, Feves au beurre and Pomme nouvelles. I had to refer  to my A to Z of Gastronomy to translate that into lamb with spinach, mushrooms, beans and new potatoes!

Food moves through the times with fashion shaping it but I support the movement for a return to simple, honest cooking.

Royal Guards Welsh Rarebit on Teeny Toasts

Teeny Toast

1 small par baked baguette
Olive oil
Powered mustard
Rock salt

With a sharp knife cut the baguette into thin round slices
In a bowl mix together the olive oil, mustard powder and rock salt
Brush the baguette rings in the mixture on both sides and bake for 10 minutes at 160C or until golden brown – these are now crostini and a very useful base for many canapé toppings

Royal Guards Welsh Rarebit

150ml bottle of quality Welsh ale
Splash of cream to help it bind
Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp wholegrain mustard
200g cheese

In a pan reduce the ale by half and add a splash of cream, a dash of Worcestershire sauce, the mustard and grated cheese.  Remove from the heat and stir to melt the cheese.  Allow this to cool and set in a block in a small plastic container.
Cut slices of the rarebit on to the teeny toasts and place in the oven or under the grill to melt and lightly brown.  Garnish with pumpkin seeds and eat in front of the telly with a glass of chilled prosecco

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